Spirituality for Peace

Kashmir’s Shah-e-Hamadan: Harbinger of spirituality with arts & crafts in the valley

Shah-e-Hamadan has not only contributed Islamic spirituality to the people but also the elements of art and crafts in Kashmir, in addition to subjects like ethics, science, philosophy, jurisprudence, theology, poetry and prose immensely in Kashmir.

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Kashmir’s Shah-e-Hamadan: Harbinger of spirituality with arts & crafts in the valleyG

od has sent revelation through Prophets in every age and to every people for the guidance of human beings:  “For each period is a Book (revealed) but only four revealed scriptures have been mentioned by name in the Qur’an: Torah, Zabur, Injeel and the final revelation, the Qur’an. Torah was given to Prophet Musa [AS], and followers of Musa are known as Jews. Injeel or the Bible was given to Prophet Isa [AS]. The Quran has been revealed to Prophet Mohammad (pbuh).

Similarly, God’s final messenger (pbuh) sent his companions to every nook and corner to convey the divine message of the Oneness in order to show them the path of eternal bliss and spirituality. After his beloved companions, the Awliya or Sufi saints spread this message far and wide.

Hazrat Syed Sharafuddin Abdul Rahman, a Turkistani saint, was probably the first Sufi who preached Islam in Kashmir. But there is not much of a literature on his life. Only a few references to him form a part and parcel of the historical narratives of medieval Kashmir. He actually laid the foundation of Sufi orders in Kashmir.

Later, the descendent of Prophet Muhammad (SAW), Hazrat Mir Syed Ali Hamadani (R.A), a Sufi of Kubrawi order from Hamadan, Iran came to Kashmir from central Asia along with 700 Sayyids to enlighten the masses with his glorious teachings. He was a Shafaee’ scholar and was born in 1314 A.D. at Hamadan, Persia from parents namely Syed Shihab-Ud-din and Saiyidnah Fatima.

Shah-e-Hamadan came to Kashmir thrice; for the first time in 1372 A.D. and left for Mecca afterwards. Thereafter, he again arrived in Kashmir and stayed briefly and left the valley again. Finally, he came to Kashmir in 1383 and remained in Kashmir for a short span of time and then met his Lord. His shrine is in Tajikistan today.

Shah-e-Hamadan contributed not only Islamic spirituality for the people, but also the elements of art and crafts in Kashmir, in addition to subjects like ethics, science, philosophy, jurisprudence, theology, poetry and prose immensely in Kashmir. He left a profound impact on the Kashmiri architecture through construction of mausoleums and tombs in Khanqahas. He was also an author and a poet par excellence and wrote books like, Zakhiratul Muluk and Muwwadatul Quraba. Zakhiratul Muluk dealt with his political ideology, the duties of rulers and the responsibilities of the people.

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